Viewing entries tagged
network science

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Episode 045 Human Networks Inspire Holiday Cheer

In this episode, Angie and Haley share clips from past interviews about the power of human networks. They also reminisce about what they have learned in 2016 and share their excitement about upcoming guests and topics to come in the new year. Happy Holidays from the HumanCurrent Complexity Podcast!


Show Notes


Quotes from this episode:

“I do not think our biggest social challenge is know-how; it’s not even money. It’s connecting the right people with the right ideas in the right way.” - Paul Shoemaker

“The cure lies with the relationships with the very people we typically blame for the problems we are trying to solve.” - Peter Senge

“In a complex adaptive system there is no separate “other”. Everything and everyone is connected and together we co-create the whole system.” - Peter Senge

 

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Episode 034 Network Challenges within Child Welfare

In this episode, Angie interviews D’Artagnan Caliman, a child welfare consultant, who discusses the complexity of serving 2 million people with many different interconnected network service groups and stakeholders. His enlightening case study reveals the importance of cause prevention within the child welfare system, rather than simply treating the symptoms of family dysfunction as they arise.


Show Notes


Quotes from this episode:

“Are we, as communities, thinking about what we can do as a human network to support families that are in need?” - D’Artagnan Caliman

“I really believe humans are the greatest resource for changing the world. It is up to us to be there for each other, our communities, and even people that we don’t know very well.” - D’Artagnan Caliman

“Our work is really focused on safety, permanency, and well-being of children and families...ensuring that a child and family is holistically successful.” - D’Artagnan Caliman

“If we are unsuccessful at helping children and families to become stable and viable within their communities, then we are failing our communities and we are failing our children.” - D’Artagnan Caliman

“We have to reach out to our constituent groups to find what is working and build upon those successes and also to hear from them on what is not working.”  - D’Artagnan Caliman

 

Resources from this episode:

Tavis Smiley Reports on PBS that the School to Prison Pipeline is “an epidemic that is plaguing schools across the nation. Far too often, students are suspended, expelled or even arrested for minor offenses that leave visits to the principal’s office a thing of the past. Statistics reflect that these policies disproportionately target students of color and those with a history of abuse, neglect, poverty or learning disabilities.”

From NY Times  “The United States has less than 5 percent of the world's population. But it has almost a quarter of the world's prisoners.”

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Episode 033 Human Stories for Network Change

In this episode, Haley interviews Jasper Faolan, a writer, psychiatric nurse practitioner, and founder of Journal to Save Your Life, which is a free, online mental health program. Jasper advocates for self-expression, like storytelling, as a way for people to heal from trauma and mental health problems. And, she explains how her non-profit (J2SYL) promotes social change by connecting the dots within complex adaptive systems.


Show Notes


Resources from this episode:

Journal to Save Your Life is a therapy program, which consists of a one to 52 week online program for young women around the ages of 13 to 29. The program is carefully curated around specific personal struggles, from addiction and body image to toxic relationships. With a concrete foundation from psychology scholars, the program aims to help young women build social skills, reframe negative thoughts and inspire artistic expression in an effort to promote self-love and healing. You can find J2SYL on Twitter & Facebook

Billy Poole’s story  #projectselfiesdefeatdepression

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Episode 032 Exploring Complex Human Networks

In this episode, Stacy interviews Angie about the ins and outs of action research for her Master’s in Leadership project. They also introduce the topic of complex human networks with guest Mary Anne Herrick, who is the Communication’s Program Officer at World Vision and the President of Foster Care Alumni of America (FCAA). FCAA  is also the sponsoring organization for Angie’s Master project.


Show Notes


Quotes from this episode:

“Action research became the opposite of scientific research. Instead of standing outside the experiment, watching what happens and writing up your findings, you become a learner in a situation you helped devise. You develop a stake. You assume responsibility.” - Marvin Wiesbord, Productive Workplaces

“Cheers to emergent social networks powered by shared narratives and shared values.” - Stacy Hale

 

Resources from this episode:

Angie's MA in Leadership is at Royal Roads University 

May is Foster Care Month! Please click here to donate to FCAA.

You can watch this video to learn more about Mary Herrick's amazing work with World Vision.

 

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Episode 021 Cultivating Social Resilience

In this episode, we interview sociologist and fellow podcaster Josh Morgan. He is the host of “The Plural of You”, a podcast inspired by stories of human good. We discuss how complex social problems influence our human networks and relationships. And, Josh helps us identify different ways in which ordinary people can influence systems-level issues, like social trust.


Show Notes


Quotes from this episode:

"A society grows great when its people plant trees whose shade they know they will never sit in." - Ancient Greek Proverb


"What makes humanity so interesting is that our complexities can't be explained with one theory because we're so highly adaptive." - Josh Morgan


"I feel my purpose as a researcher is to answer questions about complex social problems and report on them as simply as I can." - Josh Morgan

 

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Episode 006 Information, Ants & Inequality

Most of us are unaware of how our actions lead to self-organizing behavior." In this episode we talk with Diego Espinosa, founder of the complexity based Sistema Research, about the way information travels in ant colonies, financial meltdowns, and human social networks--and the things these complex systems all have in common: feedback loops. In a complex world where we are bombarded with false signals about certainty, how can we regain resilience? 


Show Notes


Quotes from this episode:

"Preferential attachment is the tendency for certain nodes within a system that have a lot of connections already to make more connections." - Stacy Hale

"A self organizing system is basically a system in which order emerges from the different pieces following simple rules and interacting with each other and that order is kind not mystical, but kind of magical in a sense." - Diego Espinosa

"The way we wanted to hold on to the certainty was by essentially borrowing money." - Diego Espinosa

"Take back control of your personal relationship with uncertainty." - Diego Espinosa

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Episode 005 Culture & Human Systems at Work

Stacy & Angie imagine the workplace as a complex living system, muse on how information travels through networks, and get meta about culture and change. Cover artwork for this week's episode: "Faberge Fractal" by Tom Beddard, sub.blue, @subblue


Show Notes


Quotes from this episode:

"Complexity is inevitable and I think it's what gives beauty to our greatest natural systems" - Stacy Hale

"By understanding complexity theory we give credence to the idea that small actions can create big change." - Stacy Hale

“Nature is not stagnant, but alive and dynamic” - Rousseau

“All human interaction is one social network.” - Geoffrey West

"Having a system thinking lens allows us to think outside of ourselves and see how someone else's interactions affect us." - Angie Cross

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Episode 004 Complexity & "Flow"

In states of "flow," inspiration and ease come effortlessly and a person does things for the sheer joy of doing them. Flow states allow us to more easily perceive networks of relationships between the elements of our selves and our environment, to handle complexity with grace and ease. What happens in these states? In this episode we explore the idea of the autotelic personality - someone who is more often than not curious, internally motivated, productive and operating with a sense of flow. What would the autotelic workplace look like? What would life be like if we spent more time in flow?


Show Notes


Quotes from this episode:

"Mihaly Csiksentmihalyi one of the authors we follow, talks about autotelic personality, which is a person who has the ability to remain in the flow state for extended periods of time and operate mostly from that." - Stacy Hale

"I think that flow states are the key to living within complexity and maintaining an awareness of it, because it exists naturally in so many situations." - Stacy Hale

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Episode 001 Why Complexity?

In this first episode of the HumanCurrent podcast, we begin our casual conversations about complexity by defining what complex systems are and why they matter in life, work, and all the things we do. What is complexity? Why do we care when there are starving people in the world? Why not focus on simplicity? Systems and networks shape our world, even (and especially) when we can't see them.


Show Notes


Quotes from this episode:

"Complexity is a fact of life and nature. We can't ignore it. We can't avoid it. It's just there. It’s a natural phenomenon." - Stacy Hale

"My goal in exploring complexity is to help people understand that it doesn't necessarily mean complicated–only non-linear." - Stacy Hale

“A complex adaptive system is a network, a set of loosely connected units each pursuing its own agenda in response to local conditions...the absence of strong central control in such networks can be a virtue because local units can adapt very quickly to new developments and because the loss of any one outpost does little damage to the whole.” - Lee Bolman and Terrence Deal

"Complexity is not some abstract academic concept that doesn't have any application close to home." - Stacy Hale

"It's a different mindset. It's about planning for adaptability and emergence versus avoiding failure and the mindset is so much about being present within the feedback loops." - Angie Cross

“The whole is disorganized but each individual fragment is in order, is a representative of a higher order. The highest order prevails even in the disintegration and the totality is president even in the broken pieces." - Aldous Huxley

 

Resources from this episode:

Reframing Organizations by Bolman & Deal

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