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complexity

Applying Complex System Science to WorkHuman

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Applying Complex System Science to WorkHuman

Angie and I recently attended the WorkHuman Conference in our home town of Austin, Texas. The event is pioneered by Globoforce, a leading provider for social recognition solutions, who is dedicated to creating more human-centered workplaces.

We were eager to attend WorkHuman for many reasons. Their speaker lineup was definitely a major draw, for it included well-known leaders Brene Brown, Shawn Achor, Salma Hayek, Simon Sinek, and Amal Clooney, among others. However, there were more compelling reasons for our excitement. We desired to learn more about this movement, to be a part of their mission and play witness, and to contribute to the conversation with our testimony about how complex system science can help transform workplaces for the better.

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Five Lessons on Complex Adaptive Systems

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Five Lessons on Complex Adaptive Systems

As a systems thinker, I don’t ever recall a time that I couldn’t see systems. However, as I was learning about the various complexity terms and aspects, light bulb after light bulb went off, and having the words that explained what I understood gave me more confidence. What I learned from my MA was rich and invaluable, and while it did not result in me being fluent in "complexity speak", the following are some of the terms that have especially resonated with me and continually show up in my work, life, and all the things I do.

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The Complexity Worldview with Jean Boulton

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The Complexity Worldview with Jean Boulton

In our upcoming episode, we share our interview with the co-author of Embracing Complexity: Strategic Perspectives for an Age of Turbulence, Jean Boulton, who is also an academic and management consultant, specializing in complexity theory. Our conversation with her was very rich, covering concepts from how complexity thinking compares to systems thinking, change management, complexity as a worldview, and even how this field is shining a light on climate change. We covered a lot of ground in the time we had with her, although we wish we could have talked longer. Her humility and brilliance were captivating and just minutes into our conversation, we realized that she lives and breathes complexity, using this worldview to frame how she thinks, feels and acts.

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Post-Election Mindfulness

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Post-Election Mindfulness

Curiosity is healthy. It’s empowering and very telling. We can learn so much, not just about the other side, but about ourselves. We can get curious about the past, and look back and question why Donald Trump was elected president (I personally believe this act of reflection is necessary and important).

To begin our quest to remain open-minded, we can use our emotions to propel us forward and to motivate us. If we channel our anger, fear, frustration, or confusion into wonder and intrigue, we can redirect what might be holding us back.

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The Emerging Narrative Shift in American Politics

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The Emerging Narrative Shift in American Politics

Many Americans are beginning to recognize how paralyzing bipartisan opposition can be; they also realize that most people agree on and hope for the same things, like financial stability, economic prosperity, national security, and equality of opportunity. They know that we can’t continue forward with the same mental models which created this bantering mess of a political system, especially since these mental models are no longer serving us or our country.

This group of dissatisfied citizenship is breaking the mold. They are seeking alternatives to their bipartisan government. According to Gallop, “an average 43% of Americans identified politically as independents in 2014”. And this climbing number of individuals identifying as independent is an unintended consequence of the U.S. political system’s rigidity (and untrustworthiness). 

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Responsible System Leadership

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Responsible System Leadership

A few weeks ago we shared our interview with system thinker and business evolutionary, Benjamin Taylor, and one of the questions we asked Benjamin was: how much control does a leader truly have when it comes to shaping company culture?

Benjamin's response was very enlightening. He described company culture as "the lived experience of the people", which means it isn't a thing which leaders can control. In fact it isn't a thing at all, rather, it is an intended or unintended consequence which results, in part, from leadership behavior. He emphasized that when leaders seek to shape or engineer a company's culture, they are seeking an unattainable level of control. 

So, if leaders have little control in shaping company culture, do they have the power to influence it at all?

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Tolerance in Social Systems

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Tolerance in Social Systems

So, if connection strengthens social networks, why do we constantly resort to rejection or isolation as a way to “resolve” social issues?

When using this tactic, we create a cycle of deflection, where the person or ‘problem’ is consistently pushed out of one system and into another. But, this mindset which is geared toward eliminating the problem, is in itself, a problem.  

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Stories & Values - The Network Glue

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Stories & Values - The Network Glue

The power and strength of human networks becomes very apparent when you take a closer look at FCAA, as a case study, for despite experiencing financial set-backs and having a very limited organizational structure; their network grows larger and stronger each year.

In the episode, “Exploring Complex Human Networks”, Stacy describes FCAA as an “emergent social network powered by shared narratives and shared values”. And, we believe it is the collection of member's stories, along with their shared values, which has propelled FCAA network growth.

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