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human history

Looking to History, Patterns & Hidden Structures for Positive Change

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Looking to History, Patterns & Hidden Structures for Positive Change

Humanity is in a crisis of consciousness. Society and the way we interact with each other is broken because we too often see the world in separate, static, and linear ways. Our reductive thinking keeps us stuck in the past, with no clear path for how to move forward, for we are in constant conflict with the complex, dynamic, and evolving world around us. Luckily, an opportunity for change is presenting itself. We have a new approach to the art of inquiry, called complexity science, which can guide us forward. A complexity science approach allows us to explore and address questions beyond the the scope of “traditional” science, including human behavior, cultures, and social movements. Complexity science pushes us to look at history, not for answers but for a map toward a more positive future and every February in the United States, we are presented with an opportune time to reflect on the past. Black History Month, which stems back to the 1920’s as “Negro History Week”, is here to remind us that the past contains important insights. Unfortunately, over the years we have missed too many of these insights and desperately need to expand our thinking in order to move forward in a positive way. With a collective shift in human consciousness, guided by missing lessons from our past and complexity science, we can work together to achieve positive change.

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The Power of Mindfulness as a Conflict-Resolution Tool

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The Power of Mindfulness as a Conflict-Resolution Tool

When many people hear the term "mindfulness," they think of things like Buddhism, meditation, being peaceful, taking walks, chewing your food slowly, etc. But mindfulness is more of a general orientation than a specific activity. To be mindful is to adopt a sense of life that says "In all things, I am student first and a teacher second." It is to maintain what Zen philosophers call "Beginner's mind." It is to live with a recognition that creativity and problem-solving becomes infinitely more likely when we listen before we talk, when we look carefully before we judge, when we aim to be present with others before preaching at them...

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