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An Intimate Conversation with Stephen Wolfram

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An Intimate Conversation with Stephen Wolfram

We recently had the privilege to talk with Stephen Wolfram at the Ninth International Conference on Complex Systems (ICCS). Wolfram is the creator of Mathematica, Wolfram|Alpha and the Wolfram Language. He is also the author of A New Kind of Science and is the founder and CEO of Wolfram Research.

Wolfram is also one of the founding fathers of the complexity science field and was the featured keynote speaker on the first night at ICCS, hosted by the New England Complex Systems Institute. He spoke for an hour and a half at the event and was followed by a very eager crowd of followers after his talk. Many of these complexity thinkers, practitioners, students and researchers lingered to ask him questions, hoping he would elaborate on his very thought-provoking presentation. During this time, Angie and I anxiously waited in our podcast booth for him to come speak with us, and after nearly 2 hours of patiently addressing his crowd’s questions, Wolfram walked into our booth. We asked him if he was up for an interview after such a long evening, and with no hesitation he sat down and put on his microphone headset.

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The Ninth International Conference on Complex Systems

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The Ninth International Conference on Complex Systems

This is a very exciting time for The Human Current! We have just come back from a wonderful conference week at The Ninth International Conference on Complex Systems (ICCS) and are about to release our 100th podcast episode!

While at ICCS we collected 30 interviews and have released 8 of these interviews so far, including Professor Yaneer Bar-Yam, Professor Ricardo Hausmann, Steven Hassan, Professor Natalia Komarova & Professor George Church!

Soon we will share our interview with one of the founding fathers of complexity science, Stephen Wolfram.

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An Informing Conversation with Complexity Labs

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An Informing Conversation with Complexity Labs

We discovered Complexity Labs several months ago after watching educational videos on their Youtube channel. Since then, we have read a number of their complexity related articles and have formed a supportive working relationship with their founder, Joss Colchester. We believe Joss and the Complexity Labs team are making a very important contribution to the complexity and systems thinking communities with their easily accessible learning content. Since Complexity Labs was established a few short years ago, they have made great impact producing over 300 video lessons, which have been viewed 2 million times.  

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Exploring Artificial Intelligence with Melanie Mitchell

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Exploring Artificial Intelligence with Melanie Mitchell

We are currently in a podcast series on the complexity of artificial intelligence and we recently shared our interview with AI researcher, leading Complex Systems Scientist, Professor of Computer Science at Portland State University, and external professor at the Santa Fe Institute, Melanie Mitchell.

Mitchell’s background originally stems from Mathematics and Physics. She became curious about how intelligence emerges from a complex system after reading Douglas Hofstadter’s book, Gödel, Escher, Bach: An Eternal Golden Braid. Hofstadter later became her Phd advisor after she sought him out at the University of Michigan. Mitchell attributes her professional journey to his guidance, as well as, Professor John Holland, who was a pioneer in the field of genetic algorithms. Holland was also an early founder of the Santa Fe Institute and encouraged Mitchell’s involvement with the Institute.

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The Complexity Worldview with Jean Boulton

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The Complexity Worldview with Jean Boulton

In our upcoming episode, we share our interview with the co-author of Embracing Complexity: Strategic Perspectives for an Age of Turbulence, Jean Boulton, who is also an academic and management consultant, specializing in complexity theory. Our conversation with her was very rich, covering concepts from how complexity thinking compares to systems thinking, change management, complexity as a worldview, and even how this field is shining a light on climate change. We covered a lot of ground in the time we had with her, although we wish we could have talked longer. Her humility and brilliance were captivating and just minutes into our conversation, we realized that she lives and breathes complexity, using this worldview to frame how she thinks, feels and acts.

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An Experience with the Institute of Noetic Sciences

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An Experience with the Institute of Noetic Sciences

Noetic science is described as “a multidisciplinary field that brings objective scientific tools and techniques together with subjective inner knowing to study the full range of human experiences”. So much of the work at IONS is research-based, but they also incorporate a broad range of human capability that go beyond science, like imagination and intuition, into their mission. IONS holds space for understanding that the relationship between the physical and the nonphysical is far more complex than we might have imagined. 

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How to Be Your Own Resume - Isaac Morehouse of Praxis

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How to Be Your Own Resume - Isaac Morehouse of Praxis

Some people believe in a linear career path. Others stop waiting for permission to create and make their own path. Entrepreneurial thinkers understand that they are part of a network, not a link in a chain. So why should we treat higher education like a conveyer belt? Decreasing transaction costs in education + rapid technological advances are making it possible to experiment with being a renaissance man or woman AND land an incredible job.

In this episode we interview Isaac Morehouse, founder of Praxis, writer, and podcaster who's obsessed with human freedom, education, and entrepreneurship.... 

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When is Too Much Order a Bad Thing?

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When is Too Much Order a Bad Thing?

How much can stock can we put in certainty? What causes financial panics? Most people blame politics, bad statistics or greed. Turns out it's more complex than that--but not all that complicated...

 

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